All posts by Tiffany Chen

As oceans acidify, it’s life or death for some marine animals

By Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the world’s oceans have been absorbing carbon dioxide caused by human activity.  Oceans act like a sponge to buffer the heating effects caused by excessive CO2 levels. Without it, the earth would be dangerously hot.

But there’s a catch. Ocean acidification is described as climate change’s “evil twin.” The dissolved form of carbon dioxide can sour the water and change the chemistry in marine environments. Scientists from the Bodega Marine Lab at the University of California, Davis, are fishing for clues to understand how ocean acidification affects the organisms that live in the sea.

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Women and minorities face discrimination, challenges in STEM fields

By Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

The fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) have long been dominated by men. Women in these fields often face harassment, discrimination and inequality.

“There are built-in biases in the system of academia that are harmful to women in particular,” said Shauna Price, a postdoctoral fellow at the Field Museum. “When I was younger. I don’t think I was taken seriously, especially because of my gender and looking young.”

Half of the women in STEM field experienced gender discrimination in their workspace, according to a Pew Research Study published in January. Salary differences in the same job and being treated as if they were not competent are the two biggest categories. Discrimination is especially common for women in STEM jobs who work mostly with men.

“The goal of the Field Museum’s Women in Science group is to increase participation in women in all areas in the sciences, and help overcome gender biases in women in the sciences,” said Price.

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Exotic pet owners may not know what they’re getting themselves into

By Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

In the Oscar-nominated movie “I, Tonya,” Allison Janney, who plays Tonya Harding’s mother in the film, has a pet parrot that perches on her shoulder. Sometimes Hollywood movies that feature exotic animals like these can start a trend in people wanting to have one of their own. And new owners may not know some of the challenges that birds and other species can present.

About one in 10 American households own an exotic pet, according to 2012 data from the American Veterinary Medical Association. Exotic animals refer to animals besides dogs and cats, including birds, reptiles and small animals like guinea pigs or ferrets.

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For scuba instructor, diving is more than recreation: it’s public safety

By Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

Even on the coldest days of winter, scuba diving instructor Nick Kouris is teaching, and some of his students go on to save lives. At the Berry Diver Center in Northfield, Kouris trains officers from fire and police departments to become public safety divers. “Scuba diving is one of the life-saving skills,” said Kouris.

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Young business owners aim to reshape Chinatown

By Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

Young entrepreneurs are introducing new hotels and big chains like Starbucks in Chicago’s Chinatown. And they’re taking over family businesses. These new ventures are remodeling storefronts and embracing phone apps to draw a new crowd to the neighborhood.

“It’s all part of an image you want to create for the younger generation,” said Matt Chui, the owner of Chui Quon Bakery, the oldest bakery in the neighborhood.

But some longtime residents of Chinatown aren’t fans of these new business models. “That’s something they don’t want to change… and that really puts off the people,” said Chui.

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At 76, Chinese dance instructor lives her passion and passes it on

By Dena Khalafallah and Tiffany Chen
Medill Reports

At 11 years old, Jin Qui Yue discovered her passion for dance and has followed it throughout her life.

At 76 years old, she continues to teach dance to students of all ages in Chicago.

“I’m 76 years old already, and I still haven’t stepped down from the stage. I’m still teaching,” Jin said.

Jin’s dance classes can be found inside the Bei Dou Kung Fu studio on 31st Street in Chicago.

“We might not be able to communicate through language, but through dancing, we can bring each other closer,” Jin said in her native tongue.

Photo at top: Jin Qui Yue dancing inside Bei Dou Kung Fu studio. Oct. 6, 2017. (Dena Khalafallah/MEDILL)