All posts by danielleprieur

And the record for the warmest year goes to…

By Danielle Prieur

It should come as no surprise to Chicagoans that 2015 was the hottest year on record. A snow-free, unseasonably warm holiday season surely gave Chicagoans a clue – 2015 is the hottest year on record.

What may come as a surprise to some is that Chicago and the Midwest aren’t alone – the hottest year on record hit the entire United States and rest of the globe.  And 2015 follows a string of recent record-breaking warm years linked to global warming.

This uniform warming is “the big story” of weather data in 2015, said Gavin A. Schmidt, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies at NASA, and Thomas R. Karl, director of NOAA’s National Climate Data Center, at a media conference call on Wednesday.

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Better living through electricity — keeping Asian carp out of the Great Lakes

By Danielle Prieur

The only thing keeping Asian carp from escaping  into Lake Michigan is an  electrical barrier located along the river.

The barrier doesn’t actually electrocute the  fish, but repels them when they encounter the strong electrical field.

But some researchers are concerned about whether the barrier can withstand the movement of barges through the river.

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Forecasting future of Asian carp in Great Lakes: An Erie story

By Danielle Prieur

Imagine trying to fish for trout in Lake Michigan or other Great Lakes, like your grandfather and father did before you.

Fishing is a summer pastime on the lakes.

“You’d have to wear armor,” said Marc Gaden, communications director and legislative liaison for the Great Lakes Fishery Commission in Ann Arbor, Mich.

He said this might be the only solution for fishermen if Asian carp get into the lakes.

Marc Gaden, communications director and legislative liaison for the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, said this might be the only solution for fishermen if Asian carp get into Lake Erie.

Case in point: Lake Erie.

Last month, University of Michigan ecologist Hongyan Zhang and her team published a report on Lake Erie in the journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society that predicted what would happen if the carp eventually made their way to Lake Erie. Continue reading