All posts by karynsimpson2018

Dinosaurs, Bones and Art, Oh My!

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

When Paul Sereno and his team at the Fossil Lab at the University of Chicago find dinosaurs, they typically just look like bits of crushed bone and rock.

How do these paleontologists, fossil preparators and paleo artists transform these fragmented fossils into life-size, flesh-and-bone dinosaurs? It takes hundreds of hours, extensive research, and just the right combination of art and science.

Photo at top: Reconstructed dinosaur model at the Paul Sereno Fossil Lab (Karyn Simpson/ MEDILL)

Putting the “giving” back in Thanksgiving

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

The In Her Shoes Foundation put the “giving” back in Thanksgiving this year.

The organization, accompanied by more than 70 volunteers, spent Thanksgiving Day at Grasmere Residential Home, a specialized mental health rehabilitation facility. There, the volunteers helped serve Thanksgiving lunch to the residents, played board games and made gratitude collages with them as part of the In Her Shoes Foundation’s Giving Back Program. Why is giving back to your community on Thanksgiving so important? “Holidays can be a tough time for people with mental illnesses,” said Kasia Wereszczynska, founder and executive director of In Her Shoes Foundation, “and taking time to truly listen to and talk with people can help them feel supported and encouraged.”

Scientists investigate how the “ocean pump” is slowing global warming

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

Scientists are taking a serious look at ocean biological systems that temper carbon levels in the atmosphere and trap them in the ocean depths, a way to slow global warming and put off the 2° C temperature rise that would trigger disastrous levels of sea level rise, extreme temperatures, rainfall and drought.

Climate scientist Jennifer Middleton calls these systems the ocean’s biological carbon pump and explained how it works at the annual Comer Climate Conference in southwest Wisconsin this fall.

Middleton, a post-doctoral research scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, is studying these systems in the hope that scientists can find ways to use them to help mitigate the effects of climate change related to fossil fuel emissions.

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What can we do to slow climate change?

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

Columbia University geochemist Wallace Broecker, one of the founding fathers of climate science, laid it on the line. The two ways we know of to bring down civilization are nuclear bombs or carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels, the driving force of climate change, he said this fall during an interview at the Comer Conference on abrupt climate change. “It’s got the seeds of really terrible chaos on the planet and we’ve got to start to respect that.”

Within days of the conference, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change cautioned that even raising the global temperatures by 1.5 degrees C (2.7 degrees F) could have disastrous effects on sea level rise, extreme temperatures, rainfall and drought. And we’ve already raised temperatures 1 degree globally.

What needs to change to mitigate the accelerating threat? Scientists sharing their latest research at the 2018 conference say we need to move swiftly toward a sustainable energy system and  trap the carbon dioxide emissions from continued near-term needs for fossil fuels. Meeting the challenge offers wide-ranging opportunities for innovation and economic growth, said Penn State climatologist Richard Alley at the conference. Continue reading

Larry Antonsen: Healing, helping and speaking out

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

Larry Antonsen wants to do everything he can to ensure no child is ever abused by a priest again. That’s why he works with the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) and attends events like All Survivor’s Day at Holy Name Cathedral Parish. The day is dedicated to drawing attention to sexual abuse by clergy members and demanding justice for the survivors. As a survivor of sexual abuse by a priest and a still-practicing member of the Catholic faith, Antonsen knows how hard it can be to heal from this kind of trauma. He wants to share his story in hopes it can give someone else the courage to come forward and get help.

Photo at top: Members of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) protest outside Holy Name Cathedral on November 3rd. (Karyn Simpson/MEDILL)

 

Israel’s Sea of Galilee and Dead Sea are dying – What is being done?

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

ISRAEL – The Dead Sea is dying. So is Israel’s Sea of Galilee – the country’s only surface-level source of freshwater. The effort to save these sacred and historic lakes involves a convoluted mix of religious tradition, tourism and technology.

Over the past several decades of carving out an oasis from the desert, Israel has pushed back countrywide water scarcity through desalination, conservation, efficient use of the country’s limited freshwater, and wastewater treatment and reuse. Today, approximately 80 percent of Israel’s drinking water comes from desalination plants, meaning that even as Israel enters its sixth consecutive year of drought, the country should continue to have a stable supply of drinking water for its residents.

The main concern surrounding the drought is the health of Israel’s two natural, above-ground bodies of water, the freshwater Sea of Galilee and the saltwater Dead Sea – both sacred to residents, if for entirely different reasons. While the Dead Sea is valued particularly because of its contributions to Israeli tourism, the Sea of Galilee holds special import in religious history and because many residents remember when it was the country’s main source of water.

“The Sea of Galilee, for all the people in Israel, is emotional – 100 percent emotional,” said Arnon Eshel, who works at Sapir, the water pumping station for the Sea of Galilee. “We come here, we see the Sea of Galilee as it looks now, we are in totally depression.”

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What the world can learn from Israel’s water reuse programs

By Karyn Simpson
Medill Reports

Negev Desert, Israel – A country that is 70 percent desert faces a unique challenge in finding sustainable water sources, but by treating and reusing approximately 90 percent of its wastewater, Israel has done just that.

The small country is light years ahead of the rest of the globe – the next closest competitor is Spain, which reuses around 30 percent of wastewater, according to Dr. Jack Gilron, head of the department of desalination and water treatment at the Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research.

Yet Israel’s success in wastewater treatment and reuse likely won’t translate effectively to other countries.

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