On track or in life, Cassie Bloch runs as a true fighter

By Athena Liu
Medill Reports

It was 90 degrees and the humidity high in Terra Haute, Indiana Sunday as Loyola senior Cassie Bloch ran the 1,500-meter final at the MVC Outdoor Championships, trying to better her bronze-medal finish of last year.

Unfortunately for Bloch, the competition was also fierce, and she finished the race in 4:31.24, which was 0.23 out of third place. But while Bloch was not the winner, she succeeded in crossing another finish line at the same time. While she was competing for the last time in a Loyola uniform in the sultry Indiana town, she also earned her degree in biochemistry, missing the graduation ceremony her classmates took part in that day, 200 miles away.

Bloch runs her last race in the Loyola uniform. (Photo courtesy of Dave Wegiel)

Bloch was not one to whom success came easily in her sport. She took the steady, painful route from the bottom of her team and developed into a champion, a record holder and a true leader of the program.
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Relation between money and happiness contingent on an individual’s situation

By Jinman Li
Medill Reports

Whether money can buy happiness varies among individuals, contingent on their backgrounds and situations and how much money the person earns.

A 2017 study from Purdue University using data from the Gallup World Poll, which surveyed more than 1.7 million people from 164 countries, found that earning between $60,000 and $75,000 a year is ideal for what lead author Andrew Jebb called “emotional well-being” in a press release. The finding aligns with a 2010 research from Princeton University, which found that people’s level of happiness rises with their annual income when it is below $75,000, but the correlation does not exist beyond that point.

Nancy Ladd, a financial advisor at Trinity Financial Advisors LLC, said although money is not the driving force of people’s happiness, it does come into play, especially when it is below a certain amount, which, according to the research, is earning $75,000 a year.

“That’s really a minimum point where people basically start to feel that they can keep their head above the water,” Ladd said.
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International Rugby Coming to Chicago

By Nick Mantas
Medill Reports

At a news conference inside Soldier Field it was announced The Rugby Weekend will be held in Chicago once again.
The last time Chicago hosted the event in 2016  sell-out crowds packed the Chicago Bears stadium to see their beloved country-men and women play rugby.

Team members from Italy, New Zealand, Ireland, and the United States all attended Tuesday’s announcement and answered questions on their anticipation of the event.


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People may not inherit parents’ money DNA, experts say

By Roxanne (Yanchun) Liu
Medill Reports

Lori Schwartz’s father, a 74-year-old doctor, only goes to restaurants for dinner where he can use coupons. Raised in a poor family, her father watches how much he spends all the time despite the good paychecks he now earns, embarrassing his daughter.

“I hate it,” she said. “His cheapness is not attractive. I never want to be like that.”

Several adults interviewed for this story said they are comfortable spending more money on themselves than their thrifty parents do, but they are still influenced by their parents’ money habits. These children cherry-pick their parents’ financial behaviors, adopting those that fit with their current economic situation and their expectations of future financial means, said Jean Marie Dillon, a certified financial planner at Freedom Financial Counseling, LLC.
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Stats LLC Brings Artificial Intelligence to Sports Broadcasts

Darren Zaslau
Medill Reports

Stats LLC, a Chicago sports data and technology company, is creating artificial intelligence to be used in sports broadcasts. The company is training computers to track player and ball movement during games to reveal advanced analytics for broadcasters, such as similar plays and success rates. As a result, fans will have a new understanding for the sports they watch.

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Coach Jared Voss Gets Win Number 500

By Nick Mantas
Medill Reports

Illinois high school baseball has a new member in the 500 club. Joliet Catholic Academy’s Head Baseball Coach Jared Voss just got win number 500 in a unique way.

Coach Voss, an alumnus of JCA, is looking to make another run at the state title and at this point their chances are pretty solid to do so.

Before the latest game against Marist High School, Voss was honored with a pregame ceremony and announcement that a commemorative plaque will be made to honor his achievement.

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Child abuse survivor recounts horrifying rape experience

Gabrielle Phifer
Medill Reports

Life after being abused can be one of the toughest moments for any person, especially for a child. Patrick Dati was just 9 years old when he was sexually abused in a bathroom at a Chicago department store.

It was difficult being abused but even more difficult when he found out his abuser was responsible for killing over 30 young boys. The shame and guilt followed him for years and there was no one that knew him that saw the signs.

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First Responders Nationwide Play in 2018 Unsung Heroes Soccer Tournament

By Darren Zaslau
Medill Reports

Soccer teams made of first responders from across the country participated in the 2018 Unsung Heroes Soccer Tournament in Chicago on May 3–4. Unsung Heroes is a fundraising organization run by volunteers who are police officers, paramedics or firefighters and community service members. The event raised money for Chicago’s injured and fallen first responders.

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Uncovering the past at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Mollie McNeel
Medill Reports

Travel about an hour southeast of Baltimore and you’ll end up in a small Maryland town called Edgewater. Keep driving past the city limits and you’ll see a brown sign on the side of the road indicating that somewhere in the thick forrest to your left is the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center where I am an embedded reporter. A long windy drive with exactly nine turns will lead you to a clearing full of lab buildings and dormitories–my home for the next month.

May 2, 2018, Edgewater, Maryland. My first week as SERC has been a whirlwind of adjusting to dorm living (once again), meeting scientists and figuring out which of the many high-stakes research projects I will be reporting about. But one exciting event came Wednesday as I joined the team at the SERC archaeology lab.

I arrived at the old house turned work center around 9 a.m.—a few minutes before everyone really began arriving. As I watched each person walk through the old screen door, it was clear that they were genuinely happy to be there. But what I didn’t realize is that they were all volunteers. The SERC archaeology lab is run by “citizen scientists” under the direction of Dr. Jim Gibb, a senior archaeologist.

The Sellman house where the Archaeology lab is located. Photo by Mollie McNeel

The day was spent inside instead of at one of the dig sites excavating oyster shells, nails, ceramics and tobacco pipes–all evidence of a structure inhabited by humans. The digs needed to dry out after stormy weather the night before. “Go get your hands dirty” was my only instruction, so I followed two others into the “kitchen” where a large wooden table sat with buckets of artifacts at one end.

“We are going to wash everything we found last week” said one of the more experienced volunteers. After a quick tutorial on how to scrub the brick, glass and pottery just right I grabbed my toothbrush and began cleaning. While the puzzle pieces of the past may seem like rubble, they are giving clues to a picture of life during the 17th century.

Pieces of glass that are believed to have once been a wine bottle. Photo by Mollie McNeel

We found lots (and lots and lots) of brick pieces which mean there was some type of structure on the property. We found green and blue glass shards—some small and some large—which were used for wine and medicines. The most exciting piece for me was finding nails that had been handcrafted leading the archaeology team to believe this site was actually the blacksmith’s shop!

Brick rubble found during the dig. Photo by Mollie McNeel

As my time with the archaeology lab came to a close I had a new appreciation for the old structures around me. Seeing these people talk of who the blacksmith could have been and what it took to make these rusty nails we were holding made me realize history is not lost, we just have to dig for it.

Preview: Illinois’ best high school lacrosse match up

By Nick Mantas
Medill Reports

Two of the best high school lacrosse programs in the state of Illinois will face-off for the first time this season.

These two schools have a rivalry that has consequences for the outcome of their games; usually the winner is the state champion.

Loyola Academy High School is hosting its rival New Trier High School Tuesday night at 5 p.m. in Wilmette, IL

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